Meniere’s disease – Treatment Diagnosis Symptoms and Causes

Meniere’s disease – Treatment Diagnosis Symptoms and Causes

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Meniere’s disease – Treatment Diagnosis Symptoms and Causes

Meniere’s disease – Treatment Diagnosis Symptoms and Causes – Meniere’s disease is a disorder of the inner ear that can cause vertigo (vertigo) and hearing loss. In most cases, Meniere’s disease affects only one ear.

Meniere’s disease can occur at any age, but it usually begins between young and middle-aged adulthood. It is considered a chronic condition, but various treatments can help relieve symptoms and reduce long-term effects on your life.

Symptoms – Meniere’s disease – Treatment Diagnosis Symptoms and Causes

Signs and symptoms of Meniere’s disease include:

Recurring episodes of vertigo. You have a spinning sensation that starts and stops spontaneously. Episodes of vertigo occur without warning and typically range from 20 minutes to several hours, but no longer than 24 hours. Severe vertigo can cause nausea.
Deafness. Meniere’s disease can and does cause hearing loss, especially early. After all, most people have some permanent hearing loss.
Ringing in the ear (tinnitus). Tinnitus is the perception of ringing, ringing, roaring, whistling or hissing sound in your ear.
Feeling of fullness in the ear. People with Meniere’s disease often feel pressure in the affected ear (aural fullness).
After an episode, the signs and symptoms improve and may disappear completely for a while. Over time, the frequency of episodes may decrease.

Causes – Meniere’s disease – Treatment Diagnosis Symptoms and Causes

The cause of Meniere’s disease is unknown. Symptoms of Meniere’s disease appear as a result of abnormal amounts of fluid (endolymph) in the inner ear, but it is unclear what happens.

Factors that affect fluids, which may contribute to Meniere’s disease, include:

Improper fluid drainage, probably due to a blockage or physical nuclear asymmetry
Abnormal immune response
viral infection
genetic predisposition
Because no single cause has been identified, it is likely that Menier’s disease arises from a combination of factors.

The diagnosis

Your doctor will conduct an examination and take a medical history. Diagnosis of Meniere’s disease requires:

Two episodes of vertigo, each lasting 20 minutes or more but not exceeding 12 hours
Hearing loss verified by hearing test
Tinnitus or feeling of fullness in your ear
Boycott other known causes of these problems
Hearing evaluation
A hearing test (audiometry) assesses how well you detect sounds in different pitches and versions and how well you distinguish between similar-sounding words. People with meniere’s disease typically have problems hearing high and low frequencies with normal hearing at low frequencies or mid-high frequencies.

Balance estimation
Between episodes of vertigo, a sense of balance is normal for most people with Meniere’s disease. But you may have some ongoing problems.

Tests that assess the function of the inner ear include:

Videostagmography (VNG). This test evaluates balance function by assessing eye movements. The balance sensors in the inner ear are connected to muscles that control eye movements. This connection enables you to move your head while focusing on a single point.
Rotary-chair test. Like a VNG, it measures inner ear function based on eye movements. You sit on a computer-controlled rotating chair, which stimulates your inner ear.
The vestibular stopped the myogenic potential (VEMP) test. This test shows promise not only for diagnosis, but also for monitoring Menier’s disease. It shows characteristic changes in the affected ears of people with Meniere’s disease.
Posturography. This computerized test shows which part of the balance system – vision, inner ear function, or sensations from the skin, muscles, tendons, and joints – you trust the most and which parts may cause problems. When wearing a safety harness, you stand barefoot on a platform and maintain your balance under various circumstances.
Video head impulse test (vHIT). This new test uses video whereby eye response is measured to inhibit movement. When you focus on a point, your head quickly and unexpectedly turns. If your eyes turn away from the target when your head turns, you have an abnormal reflex.
Electrocoleography (ECOG). This test looks at the inner ear in response to sounds. It may help to determine if there is an abnormal buildup of fluid in the inner ear, but it is not specific for Meniere’s disease.

Treatment – Meniere’s disease – Treatment Diagnosis Symptoms and Causes

There is no cure for Meniere’s disease. A number of treatments may help reduce the severity and frequency of vertigo episodes. But, unfortunately, there are no treatments for hearing loss.

Medications for vertigo
Your doctor may prescribe medications during an episode of vertigo to reduce the severity of an attack:

Motion sickness medications, such as mocetalizine or diazepam (valium), may reduce spinning sensation and help control nausea and vomiting.
Anti-nausea medications, such as promethazine, can control nausea and vomiting during a episode of vertigo.
Prolonged drug use
Your doctor may prescribe a medication to reduce fluid retention (diuretic) and suggest that you limit your salt intake. For some people, this combination helps control the severity and frequency of Meniere’s disease symptoms.

Non-medical treatment and procedures
Some people with meniere’s disease may benefit from other non-medical treatments and procedures, such as:

Rehabilitation. If you have a balance problem between episodes of vertigo, vestibular rehabilitation therapy can improve your balance.
hearing aid. A hearing aid in the ear affected by Meniere’s disease can improve your hearing. Your doctor can discuss with an audiologist what hearing aid options are best for you.
Positive pressure therapy. For vertigo that is difficult to treat, this therapy involves pressurizing the middle ear to reduce fluid buildup. An instrument called the Maniot pulse generator applies pressure to the ear canal through a ventilation tube. You do the treatment at home, usually five times a day, three times a day.

Positive pressure therapy has shown improvement in vertigo, tinnitus, and aural pressure symptoms in some studies, but not in others. Its long-term effectiveness has not yet been determined.

What is the best treatment for Meniere’s disease?

Motion sickness medications, such as mocetalizine or diazepam (valium), may reduce spinning sensation and help control nausea and vomiting. Anti-nausea medications, such as promethazine, can control nausea and vomiting during a episode of vertigo.

Does Meniere’s disease go away?

There is no cure for Meniere’s Disease. Meniere’s disease cannot be treated and can be made to “go away” like you never had. It is a progressive disease that worsens, slowly in some and quickly in others. Some patients experience periods of remission without any apparent cause (absence of some or all of the symptoms).

How long does Meniere’s disease last?

Meniere’s disease is an inner-ear condition that can cause vertigo, which makes you feel as if you are spinning. Attacks can last as long as 20 minutes or as long as 24 hours. You may meet several in a week, or they may come apart months or even years. Later, you may feel tired and need to rest.

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