Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms | Scarlet Fever – Risk factors Causes and Complications

Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms

Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms

Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms – Scarlet fever is a bacterial disease that develops in some people who have a sore throat. Also known as scarletina, scarlet fever has a bright red rash that covers most of the body. Scarlet fever is almost always accompanied by a sore throat and high fever.
Scarlet fever is most common in children between 5 and 15 years of age. Although scarlet fever was considered a serious childhood disease, antibiotic treatments have made it less threatening. Nevertheless, if left untreated, scarlet fever can result in more serious conditions that affect the heart, kidneys, and other parts of the body.

Why is scarlet fever rare now?

Scarlet fever rash is caused by a toxin that produces strep bacteria. Scarlet fever was once common in children between 2 and 10 years of age, but is now relatively rare. The reason for this remains a mystery, especially because there has been no decrease in the number of cases of strep throat or strep skin infection.

What are the long term effects of scarlet fever? Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms

In general, if there is a long-term effect, proper diagnosis and treatment of scarlet fever is made. However, if complications develop for some reason, kidney damage, hepatitis, vasculitis, septicemia, heart failure, and even death can be included.

Is strep throat and scarlet fever the same thing?

When bacteria infect the throat, the disease is called strep throat. Streptococci can also produce a toxin that results in a specific skin rash. When it occurs, the disease is called scarlet fever.

Where is scarlet fever most common in the world?

In recent years, there have been increasing reports of scarlet fever in many countries including England, Wales, South Korea, Vietnam, China and Hong Kong. Researchers are unsure about the spike in cases of the disease.

Symptoms – Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of scarlet fever include its name:

Red rash. The rash looks like a sunburn and feels like sandpaper. It usually begins on the face or neck and extends to the trunk, arms and legs. If the pressure is applied to the red skin, it will turn yellow.
Red lines. The skin around the waist, armpits, elbows, knees, and neck usually turn dark red compared to the surrounding rash.
Washed face. The face may glow with a yellow ring around the mouth.
Strawberry Tongue. The tongue usually looks red and bumpy, and is often covered with a white coating at the onset of the disease.

Complications – Scarlet Fever – Risk factors Causes and Complications

If the red colored fever becomes untreated, the bacteria can spread:

Tonsils
The lungs
The skin
Kidney
blood
middle ear

Rarely, scarlet fever can cause arthritis, a serious condition that can affect:

heart
Joint
Nervous system
The skin

Causes – Scarlet Fever – Risk factors Causes and Complications

Scarlet fever is caused by the same type of bacteria that causes strep throat. In scarlet fever, bacteria release a toxin that produces rash and red tongue.

The infection spreads from one person to another when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The incubation period – the time between exposure and disease – is usually two to four days.

Treatment – Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms

If your child has scarlet fever, your doctor will prescribe an antibiotic. Make sure that your child completes the full course of medicine. Failure to follow treatment guidelines may not completely eliminate the infection and your child will have an increased risk of developing complications.

Your child can return to school when he or she has taken antibiotics for at least 24 hours and is no longer feverish.

The risk – Scarlet Fever – Risk factors Causes and Complications

Children between the ages of 5 and 15 are more likely to have scarlet fever than others. Scarlet fever germs spread more easily in close contact with people, such as family members or classmates.

Prevention – Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms

There is no vaccine to prevent scarlet fever. The best prevention strategies for scarlet fever are similar to the standard precautions against infection:

Wash Your Hands Show your child how to wash their hands thoroughly with warm soapy water.
Do not share eating utensils or food. As a rule, your child should not share drinking glasses or eating utensils with friends or classmates. This rule also applies to sharing food.
Cover your mouth and nose. Tell your child to cover their mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing to prevent the possible spread of germs.

How serious is scarlet fever?

Although scarlet fever was considered a serious childhood disease, antibiotic treatments have made it less threatening. Nevertheless, if left untreated, scarlet fever can result in more serious conditions that affect the heart, kidneys, and other parts of the body.

Can scarlet fever go away on its own?

Most mild cases of scarlet fever resolve themselves within a week of treatment. However, treatment is important, as it will accelerate recovery and reduce the risk of complications. Treatment usually involves a 10-day course of oral antibiotics, usually penicillin.

How long is Scarlet Fever Contagious? Scarlet Fever: Prevention Treatment and Symptoms

Scarlet fever lasts about a week. You are infected for up to 7 hours before symptoms begin, up to 24 hours after taking the first antibiotic pills. People who do not take antibiotics can be contagious up to 2 to 3 weeks after the onset of symptoms.

Can I catch scarlet fever from my child?

However, people of any age can get this disease. Since it is very contagious, scarlet fever is likely to come into close contact with a skin infection caused by a sore throat or streptococcus bacteria. Outbreaks often occur in nurseries and schools where children are in close contact with each other.

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